Revealed: #19 to Sport SURFboard® Logo This Weekend in Charlotte

Carl Edwards’ #19 car will feature special SURFboard® paint scheme in Charlotte, North Picture1-twitterCarolina, this weekend.

At this weekend’s NASCAR All-Star race in Charlotte, Carl Edwards’ #19 car will feature the ARRIS SURFboard logo, driving awareness of who we are and what we do, focusing on our SURFboard products available at retail.

It’s the perfect way to showcase our SURFboard High-speed Cable Modems and Routers that provide the fastest speeds available — and the #1 selling brand of modems.

Check out Carl’s promotional video for the new ARRIS SURFboard Home Networking devices with RipCurrent™ G.hn technology– plus video shoot outtakes with Carl and the #19 team.

We have exciting promotions planned for race fans, including Twitter giveaways, videos on ARRIS.com, and more. Plus, ARRIS will mark the Joe Gibbs Racing 25th Anniversary by showcasing our technology at JGR’s Employee Event.

This will be Edwards’ 11th All-Star race since he entered the Sprint Cup Series full-time in 2006.

Tune in, and let’s cheer Carl and his SURFboard #19 on to Victory Lane!

NASCAR Sprint Cup Series – Sprint All-Star Race

  • Charlotte Motor Speedway, Charlotte, NC (1.5-Mile Oval)
  • Carl Edwards in the No. 19 ARRIS Surfboard Toyota
  • Live Coverage of the Sprint All-Star race from Charlotte Motor Speedway will begin Saturday, May 21 at 7 PM ET on Fox Sports 1

NASCAR Camping World Truck Series – North Carolina Education Lottery 200

  • Charlotte Motor Speedway, Charlotte, NC (1.5-Mile Oval)
  • Daniel Suarez in the No. 51 ARRIS Tundra with KBM
  • Live Coverage of the race from Charlotte Motor Speedway will begin Friday, May 20 at 8 PM ET on Fox Sports 1 (race starts at 8:30 PM ET)

 

Demonstrating Gigabit Speeds to the Home at INTX

Picture22At INTX, ARRIS is showcasing new additions and extensions to our flagship E6000® Converged Edge Router (CER), the industry’s most widely deployed CCAP™ platform. These enhancements—including a new 10G EPON Fiber Module, Router Switch Module 2 (RSM-2) and UCAM-2 module—will help our service provider customers scale to tomorrow’s even higher bandwidth services by preparing their networks for DOCSIS® 3.1 migration and multi-gigabit speeds of the future.

We’ll demonstrate the updated capabilities of our E6000 CER, including:

  • The new multi-gigabit services and greater capacity that operators can deliver with the 10G EPON Fiber Module and the Router System Module 2 (RSM-2)
    • The high-density 10G EPON solution will be shown live for the first time, demonstrating multi-gigabit symmetrical service delivery with the E6000 chassis
    • Also shown for the first time is the RSM-2, which substantially increases the E6000 network-side interface capacity and its packet forwarding capacity, preparing the E6000 platform for future bandwidth growth
  • The super-fast upstream speeds enabled by the DOCSIS 3.1 capable UCAM-2
    • The UCAM-2 provides significant increases in both DOCSIS 3.0 upstream channel capacity per service group and the ability to support DOCSIS 3.1 in the upstream
  • The doubling of downstream DOCSIS 3.1 support with the current, first-generation DCAM via a software-only upgrade.
  • Convergence of video into the platform with traditional MPEG digital video and IP video
    • Realizing the goal of converging video and data into the CCAP

We will also have a static display of our planned Remote PHY (R-PHY) solution, which will further extend the capabilities of the E6000 CER.

Stop by our booth (#1214) to see our expanded downstream offerings for DOCSIS 3.1 as well as our new advancements to support it in the upstream.

Extending DOCSIS® 3.1 to Meet Bandwidth Needs in 2030 and Beyond

Tom Cloonan, ARRIS CTO, Network Solutions

Tom Cloonan, ARRIS CTO, Network Solutions

The latest industry predictions for bandwidth demand show DOCSIS 3.1’s10-15 Gbps capacity becoming limited by the middle of the 2020 decade. This has to do with the rise of IoT, seemingly constant growth in connected devices, and more and more bandwidth-hungry services.

This week at INTX I’m presenting the highlights from a paper I co-authored about how to extend bandwidth capacity to anticipate this demand. One component of this strategy involves Extended Spectrum DOCSIS, which has the potential to extend the runway another decade or so.

Extended Spectrum DOCSIS uses downstream frequency modulation to achieve huge gains in bitrate capacity with the same power budget. For service providers, that results in crucial cost efficiencies in the near term and speeds of more than 50 Gbps in the long term.

Please join me on Monday, May 16 at 2 p.m. ET, Room 157, where I’ll present highlights of this new approach and my thoughts for a gradual migration plan in my session on “Architecting the Networked Future: Part 1.” I hope to see you there.

ARRIS Tech Talk: Modems, Routers, Gateways, and Extenders Demystified

Fact: We need fast, reliable Internet. And increasingly, we need it everywhere.

Nearly three-quarters of us believe that having high-speed Internet in every room of the house is either vitally important or very important. That’s according to our latest Consumer Entertainment Index study.

High-speed Internet is so important because it is related to almost everything we do, from image1video chatting with our family and friends to streaming movies on Netflix® and gaming over the Playstation® and Xbox One networks. A lot of things run expressly on the Internet, and the Internet, in turn, relies on the devices that deliver it throughout our homes.

Today we’re going to talk about the four most important ones: modems, Wi-Fi® routers, broadband gateways, and extenders.

The first piece of the puzzle is your modem: it brings the Internet into your home. Because it’s your home’s primary connection to the Internet, it’s arguably the most important device.

Of course, we all just want Wi-Fi without limits, and for that, you need a Wi-Fi router. It takes the Internet from your modem and creates a wireless signal that you can access throughout your home. But keep in mind that the strength of that wireless signal changes based on things inside your home, like the type of walls or floors it has to go through or how far away it is from the devices that it’s communicating with (i.e. tablets, cellphones)

A gateway is a device that combines the modem and Wi-Fi router into a single device. It brings the Internet signal into your home and also transmits it wirelessly.

So now we have our modem, router and gateway—but what happens when there’s a room in your home where the Wi-Fi is very weak or non-existent? There are many ways to improve the range of the Internet in your home, but one of the simplest and most cost-efficient is using a Wi-Fi network extender or repeater. It receives the wireless signal from your router or gateway and boosts it a further distance than the router may be capable of broadcasting on its own—like a megaphone does with your voice. But keep in mind that each wireless repeater cuts your bandwidth in half. So while it allows you to cover more ground, you’ll also lose some effective speed.

Now that we’ve talked about how these networking pieces work together, how do you know which one to buy? Check out our SURFboard web site for more information.

Life in the Fast Lane: The Road to Top Speed Entertainment

The future is speed. The speed to stream 4K over multiple screens. Speed that’s ahead of its time that can deliver the services we haven’t even invented yet. Multi-gigabit speed.

That, according to Cornel Ciocirlan, CTO, EMEA, ARRIS—is the answer to the mounting challenge facing service providers today: how to invest in the infrastructure to drive tomorrow’s services. 

In that context, there are many kinds of speed—from ultimate data rates to the home, to latency times, to wireless signal strength throughout the home. These will be instrumental in delivering virtual and augmented reality, next-generation gaming, cloud-based processing, and more of the experiences that will become mainstream.

Today’s average broadband speed is only 22.1Mbps. And while Europe compares favorably to the rest of the world, many of today’s leading service providers have already chosen from one of the many pathways to tomorrow’s multi-gigabit speeds—including DOCSIS 3.1, G.fast, NG-PON2, and 10G EPON.

However, the next, looming question beyond home delivery is how to enhance gigabit connectivity once it’s in the home…

ARRIS’s latest Consumer Entertainment Index found that people not only want more from their broadband, but that they see Wi-Fi as the limiting factor. Some 72% indicated the importance of high-speed internet in every room, and 54% expressed interest in extend their Wi-Fi beyond its current range.

The conditions in Europe pose a unique set of challenges for these growing demands on the home network… For example, although the average home in Europe is smaller than, say, the US, the construction materials that are popular in Europe generally preclude Wi-Fi signals from reaching every corner of the home. Additionally, the amount of power that legally can be used by a Wi-Fi access point to deliver its signal is notably lower than in many other regions of the world; this specific component of European legislation means that Wi-Fi connection range ultimately will be shorter, especially where higher speeds are involved.

As speeds within the home, especially over the wireless network, become a growing imperative, they underscore such tools and technologies as range extenders and wired backhauls. To achieve the high bandwidth and low latency that’s required to enable advanced, interactive entertainments, for example, some homes will need an extender in every room to deliver consistent data rates throughout the house. That’s why service providers like Get in Norway are offering extenders or amplifiers to their customers now.

Given these conditions, we can envisage homes becoming mesh networks that require a smart gateway to manage all the various access points and extenders that will find their way into the consumer domain.

The question many providers have in mind is how soon we can expect to need gigabit, or even multi-gigabit speeds, throughout the home. We predict that by 2020, it will be a mass-market reality… but at our current trajectory, today’s technology can only sustain a few more years of growth.

In order to maintain a great user experience, service providers must begin investing in home network improvements now.

There’s a lot to be excited about when it comes to the multi-gigabit future. Consumers can look forward to faster speeds and new ways to enjoy content at home. And providers can diversify their product offerings to make the best use of these performance boosts. But the future depends as much on new infrastructure to the home as it does on equipment within the home—from smart gateways to extenders. Only with the right foundation can the industry keep pace with the speed of the future.

Top 5 Tech Articles You Might Have Missed – Week Ending April 22, 2016

FierceCable reported on ARRIS’s new products and deals announced this week. The company introduced a new line of SURFboard ® routers and extenders with RipCurrent™ G.hn technology, designed for the “next-generation Wi-Fi home.” At this week’s NAB show, ARRIS announced that it has signed an agreement with HBO to sell its DSR-7400 transcoder satellite receiver to enable the programmer for future content distribution with HEVC compression. ARRIS also announced that VUBIQUITY is using its SECUREMEDIA content protection solution to pre-encrypt video content.

Confirming reports from earlier this year, YouTube rolled out 360-degree live streaming for its videos along with spatial audio for select on-demand content, reported PCWorld. Select performances from this weekend’s music event, Coachella, will now be live streamed in 360 degrees on YouTube.

World Screen reported that Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) launched its first TV Everywhere streaming service, Watch OWN, allowing access to a live feed of OWN and a selection of on-demand content. Watch OWN is available on iOS and Android devices.

According to a new report from Adobe and The Diffusion Group (TDG), consumers now spend 42 percent of TV time with over-the-top (OTT) services, reported CED Magazine. The report noted that 65 percent of the OTT time on the home TV screen is spent watching subscription video on demand (SVOD), 30 percent is spent watching free streaming services (FVOD), and 5 percent is spent watching transactional streaming services (TVOD).

Finally, a recent report from the European Audiovisual Observatory shows that European productions account for 27 percent of all films available on video on demand (VOD) in Europe, compared with 59 percent for U.S. films, reported TVBEurope. Additionally, 30 percent of films available on SVOD in Europe are of European origin, compared with 60 percent for U.S. films.

  1. Arris sells DSR-7400 transcoder satellite receiver to HBO, announces new line of Surfboard products (April 19, 2016) By Daniel Frankel, FierceCable: Announcing an array of new products and deals at this week’s NAB show, Arris said it has reached a deal with HBO to provide its DSR-7400 transcoder satellite receiver.
  2. YouTube rolling out live 360-degree videos with immersive Coachella experience (April 19, 2016) By Ian Paul, PCWorld: YouTube 360-degree live video is here, and you’re first chance to see it will probably be during the Coachella festival on Saturday and Sunday.
  3. OWN Unveils Its First TV Everywhere App (April 20, 2016) By Sara Alessi, World Screen: Oprah Winfrey Network has launched its first TV Everywhere streaming service, offering access to a live feed of the channel and a selection of on-demand programming.
  4. New Report Says Consumers Spend 42 Percent of TV Time on OTT (April 20, 2016) By Laura Hamilton, CED Magazine: More data continues to flow in about consumers’ love-fest with over-the-top video.
  5. Europe contributes a quarter of VoD film (April 20, 2016) By James Groves, TVBEurope: European production companies supply 27 percent of the continent’s VoD film content, according to the latest report from the European Audiovisual Observatory.
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